FORGE WORK

Tools and Equipment used for hot-work

GAS FORGE

I've built a few different forges over the years and recently began work on yet another, but for now I'm still using this forced-air ribbon-burner forge that I built from an old propane tank, some plumbing pipes, a bit of scrap steel and some high-temperature refractory materials. The forge reaches temperatures well in excess of 1000° Celcius, or up to about 2000° Fahrenheit.

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BÊCHÉ 35KG PNEUMATIC POWERHAMMER

The pneumatic powerhammer is a workhorse of the forge, delivering heavy blows to draw out large stock in far fewer heats than would be possible using just human strength. With a ram weight of 35 kilograms and an integrated, continuously cycling air compressor, this machine can draw out a large billet of damascus in just three or four heats. Bêché hammers are known to punch well above their weight class, but can also deliver lighter blows when called upon.

TITANGRINDER 30 TON HYDRAULIC FORGING PRESS

The hydraulic forging press is a modern piece of equipment that provides the operator with a much higher level of control than the airhammer. Instead of heavy percussive blows it delivers up to 30 tons of steady downward pressure, and through the use of custom dies and forms can squeeze a bar of steel into all manner of shapes.

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ARM AND HAMMER (AND ANVILS)

While presses and powerhammers can't be beat for the heavy forge-work required in making damascus or reducing large stock, it's still my arm and hammer that does much of the final forge work on my knives. I currently have three anvils and over a dozen hammers of varying shapes and sizes that I use regularly in my blade forging work.

MORE HAMMERS

Because everybody loves pictures of old industrial forging equipment. In the foreground is the 65KG Bêché, currently undergoing some maintenance work. The 35KG Bêché sits just beside its big brother. Not pictured is a 26KG Reiter that is currently awaiting a new foundation pad.

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